Tribune

EXERCISE

Remember Cindy Crawford’s exercise tape? Rose Byrne’s next role gave her flashbacks | Tribune

When Rose Byrne was playing a tormented ’80s aerobics instructor in the Apple TV+ series “Physical” — a role that required her to radiate despair while marching it out in leg warmers and a barely there leotard — she tried to remember something Susan Sarandon once told her about “Thelma & Louise.”

“She said she was so focused on all the driving she had to do that she didn’t have time to do so much acting,” Byrne said recently. “It became a lesson in how, with the focus required for a task like driving — or, in my case, aerobics — it’s impossible to be as self-conscious in our performance. Even in my extremely tight leotard.”

In the dramedy, set near San Diego in 1981, Byrne stars as Sheila Rubin, a former Berkeley activist turned disillusioned housewife who can hardly tolerate her boorish husband, Danny (Rory Scovel), a washed-up radical

Read More Read More
THERAPY

Bill Cosby denied parole after failing to participate in ‘sex offender’ therapy program | Tribune

Bill Cosby was denied parole in his sex assault case this month in part because of his failure to complete a prison program for sex offenders, the Pennsylvania Parole Board said.

The comedian isn’t eligible for release until Sept. 25 at the earliest, but the board starts interviewing candidates three to five months in advance and spoke to Cosby by video conference on May 7, board spokeswoman Laura Treaster told the Daily News on Thursday.

Based on the interview, the board denied his parole, Treaster said.

In a letter detailing its decision, the board cited Cosby’s failure to complete the therapy, failure to develop a parole release plan and a “negative recommendation” from corrections officials.

The next time Cosby goes before the board, officials will look to see whether he has “successfully participated in/successfully completed a treatment program for sex offenders and violence prevention,” the letter shared by Treaster said.

Read More Read More
THERAPY

No-cancel culture: How telehealth is making it easier to keep that therapy session | Tribune

When the COVID-19 pandemic forced behavioral health providers to stop seeing patients in person and instead hold therapy sessions remotely, the switch produced an unintended, positive consequence: Fewer patients skipped appointments.

That had long been a problem in mental health care. Some outpatient programs previously had no-show rates as high as 60%, according to several studies.

Only 9% of psychiatrists reported that all patients kept their appointments before the pandemic, according to an American Psychiatric Association report. Once providers switched to telepsychiatry, that number increased to 32%.

Not only that, but providers and patients say teletherapy has largely been an effective lifeline for people struggling with anxiety, depression and other psychological issues during an extraordinarily difficult time, even though it created a new set of challenges.

Many providers say they plan to continue offering teletherapy after the pandemic. Some states are making permanent the temporary pandemic rules that allow providers

Read More Read More
DENTAL

Japan funding, Navy building $45 million medical-dental clinic for Marines on Guam | Tribune

May 11—The Navy has awarded a $45 million contract to build a medical and dental clinic at a new Marine Corps base on Guam.

A joint venture between Guam’s Core Tech, the Hawaiian Dredging Construction Company and Japan’s Kaijima Corp. will build the facility at Camp Blaz, according to a Monday statement from Naval Facilities Engineering Command Pacific.

The clinic will include pharmacy, physical therapy, radiology, laboratory, logistics, optometry, occupational health and dental departments, the statement said.

Blaz, near Andersen Air Force Base, is being built to accommodate the move of 5,000 members of the III Marine Expeditionary Force off Okinawa over the next five years.

The camp was commissioned in September as the first new Marine installation since Marine Corps Logistics Base Albany opened in Georgia on March 1, 1952.

The new clinic being funded by the Japanese government, according to the Navy statement. Japan is paying for $3

Read More Read More
TREATMENT

Infusion treatment continues to show outstanding results | Tribune

Apr. 4—ALBANY — In the first three months of its use at Phoebe, monoclonal antibody infusion therapy has shown outstanding results for COVID-19 patients at high risk of developing severe illness. The therapy was part of President Trump’s treatment regimen when it was in an experimental stage last October. The following month, the Food and Drug Administration gave the treatment emergency use authorization, and Phoebe began providing the therapy to approved patients in early January.

“The therapy is approved for high-risk patients soon after their diagnosis,” Phoebe Putney Health System Chief Medical Officer Dr. Dianna Grant said. “The goal is to help those patients avoid emergency room visits and hospital stays, and that is exactly what we are achieving with our use of the treatment at Phoebe.”

Through April 1, Phoebe has provided the treatment to 194 patients at Phoebe North and 75 at Phoebe Sumter.

“Only two of the

Read More Read More
THERAPY

Gene Collier: Gene Therapy: Ohio joins Pennsylvania with ‘stand-your-ground’ law, also known as ‘make my day’ | Tribune

Apr. 7—Another active shooter was getting busy with his Second Amendment rights as I sat down to write this Tuesday morning, with no final accounting of this latest swoop of metronomic American carnage yet available at deadline.

The ghoulish tally in Frederick, Md., where the active shooter’s day ended typically in his own death, will attach to the spike in gun violence that began last month in Atlanta and Boulder, where 18 bloody corpses served to illustrate a nation eager to get back to slaughtering each other with real bullets rather than waiting out some soulless pathogen.

But there was more gun news Tuesday.

In Ohio, Tuesday was the day the new state law took effect, officially plunging the Buckeye State into the company of 37 others (including the Keystone State) with so-called stand-your-ground laws in the statutes.

Funny how this works, and by funny I mean, of course, tragic.

Read More Read More
TREATMENT

Temple will take over Cancer Treatment Centers of America’s Philadelphia location | Tribune

Mar. 26—Temple University Health System has agreed to buy the Philadelphia location of Cancer Treatment Centers of America, the two organizations said Thursday. The price was not disclosed.

Cancer Treatment Centers of America is a private for-profit. Temple said it will convert the Juniata Park location into a nonprofit. The deal includes buildings, equipment, and supplies.

Michael A. Young, president and chief executive of Temple University Health System, said the acquisition will give Temple office space to replace what was lost in a fire last year. The deal will also provide room to spread out clinical programs that are now crammed into Temple University Hospital, and it offers a good chance to hire many of the 350 cancer center employees who generate high patient satisfaction scores.

“This gives us clinical opportunity, close enough to Temple that will allow us to eventually move some programs over there,” Young said. It could

Read More Read More
TREATMENT

WATCH: West Chester trustee shows scars on his chest during meeting to challenge treatment of Asian Americans | Tribune

Mar. 24—West Chester Twp. Trustee Lee Wong bared his chest during the board meeting Tuesday night‚ revealing a vicious scar from injuries sustained in the U.S. Army and saying he won’t tolerate anyone discriminating against him.

“I have put up with a lot of (expletive) in silence, excuse me the language, too afraid to speak out, fearing more abuse and discrimination,” Wong said.

During the elected officials’ comment section of the meeting, Wong shared his personal history, saying he moved to the U.S. from China when he was 18 and suffered a beating in Chicago because of his race a few years later. He served 20 years in the armed forces and received the scar while he was at Fort Jackson in South Carolina.

He then calmly took off his tie, unbuttoned his dress shirt, pushed the shirt aside, stood and pulled up his undershirt to show the old wound.

Read More Read More
TREATMENT

From Britain’s aggressive tabloids, no regrets over royal pair’s treatment | Tribune

LONDON — Britain’s tabloid newspapers — pugnacious, salacious and utterly unabashed — have long played an outsized role in the country’s culture and society. They gleefully stalk celebrities, pounce on scandal, make or break political careers, prop up or tear down iconic national institutions.

Few were surprised, then, that the tabloids — mass-audience publications whose lurid headlines and compact dimensions once set them apart from the country’s more somber “broadsheet” papers — emerged as a key player in the tumultuous saga of Prince Harry and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex.

By the couple’s account, a drumbeat of lies and overt racism in tabloid accounts exacerbated and amplified the travails that ultimately led them to leave palace life behind. Harry blamed the “toxic” environment on intimidation, saying his royal relatives were cowed into submission, unwilling to publicly defend the pair, because they were afraid of bad press.

“There is this invisible contract”

Read More Read More