CDC

TREATMENT

Treating Pink Eye (Conjunctivitis) | CDC

There are times when it is important to seek medical care for conjunctivitis (pink eye). However, this is not always necessary. To help relieve some of the inflammation and dryness caused by conjunctivitis, you can use cold compresses and artificial tears, which you can purchase over the counter without a prescription. You should also stop wearing contact lenses until your eye doctor says it’s okay to start wearing them again. If you did not need to see a doctor, do not wear your contacts until you no longer have symptoms of pink eye.

When to Seek Medical Care

You should see a healthcare provider if you have conjunctivitis along with any of the following:

  • pain in the eye(s)
  • sensitivity to light or blurred vision that does not improve when discharge is wiped from the eye(s)
  • intense redness in the eye(s)
  • symptoms that get worse or don’t improve, including pink eye
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TREATMENT

For Clinicians: Pertussis Treatment | CDC

  • Treat appropriately for pertussis. Because pertussis may progress rapidly in young infants, treat suspected and confirmed cases promptly. However, treatment is ineffective if started late in the course of illness.
  • Quickly report cases of pertussis to the local public health department to assist with preventing additional cases.

Timing

Early treatment of pertussis is very important. The earlier a person, especially an infant, starts treatment the better. If a patient starts treatment for pertussis early in the course of illness, during the first 1 to 2 weeks before coughing paroxysms occur, symptoms may be lessened.

Clinicians should strongly consider treating prior to test results if clinical history is strongly suggestive or patient is at risk for severe or complicated disease (e.g., infants). If a clinician diagnoses the patient late, antibiotics will not alter the course of the illness. Even without antibiotics, those patients should no longer be spreading pertussis.

Persons with

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HEALTH

Who gets Covid-19 vaccine next? Older adults and ‘frontline essential workers,’ CDC advisers recommend

That would put those people in “Phase 1b” of allocating the vaccine nationwide.

That committee vote also included prioritizing adults ages 65 to 75, people ages 16 to 64 with high-risk medical conditions and “other essential workers” in “Phase 1c” of allocation.

“They really serve to address the current lack of vaccine supply and address those individuals with the highest risk for disease,” Dr. José Romero, chair of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices and secretary of the Arkansas Department of Health, said about the recommendations.

The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices met on Sunday to discuss Phases 1b and 1c of vaccine distribution.

In a previous meeting earlier this month, the group voted on Phase 1a, which advised giving the first round of vaccines to health care workers and residents of long-term care facilities.

There are two Covid-19 vaccines — Pfizer/BioNTech’s and Moderna’s — currently authorized for emergency use

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DENTAL

Guidance for Dental Settings | CDC

Key Points

  • Recognize dental settings have unique characteristics that warrant specific infection control considerations.
  • Prioritize the most critical dental services and provide care in a way that minimizes harm to patients from delaying care and harm to personnel and patients from potential exposure to SARS-CoV-2 infection.
  • Proactively communicate to both personnel and patients the need for them to stay at home if sick.
  • Know the steps to take if a patient with COVID-19 symptoms enters your facility.

Background

This interim guidance has been updated based on currently available information about coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and the current situation in the United States. As dental healthcare facilities begin to restart elective procedures in accordance with guidance from local and state officials, there are precautions that should remain in place as a part of the ongoing response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Most recommendations in this updated guidance are not new (except as

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