Day: April 4, 2021

SUPPLEMENT

Uses, Deficiency, Dosage, Food Sources, and More

Vitamin K plays a key role in helping the blood clot, preventing excessive bleeding. Unlike many other vitamins, vitamin K is not typically used as a dietary supplement.

Vitamin K is actually a group of compounds. The most important of these compounds appears to be vitamin K1 and vitamin K2. Vitamin K1 is obtained from leafy greens and some other vegetables. Vitamin K2 is a group of compounds largely obtained from meats, cheeses, and eggs, and synthesized by bacteria.

Vitamin K1 is the main form of vitamin K supplement available in the U.S.

Recently, some people have looked to vitamin K2 to treat osteoporosis and steroid-induced bone loss, but the research is conflicting. At this point there is not enough data to recommend using vitamin K2 for osteoporosis.

Why do people take vitamin K?

Low levels of vitamin K can raise the risk of uncontrolled bleeding. While vitamin K deficiencies

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EXERCISE

Sciatica Symptoms, Causes, Treatments, Exercise

What Is Sciatica?

Sciatica is a common type of pain affecting the sciatic nerve, a large nerve extending from your lower back down the back of each leg.

Sciatica Symptoms

Common symptoms of sciatica include:

  • Lower back pain
  • Pain in the rear or leg that is worse when sitting
  • Hip pain
  • Burning or tingling down the leg
  • Weakness, numbness, or a hard time moving the leg or foot
  • A constant pain on one side of the rear
  • A shooting pain that makes it hard to stand up

Sciatica usually affects only one side of the lower body. Often, the pain extends from the lower back all the way through the back of your thigh and down through your leg. Depending on where the sciatic nerve is affected, the pain may also extend to the foot or toes.

For some people, the pain from sciatica can be severe and disabling. For

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TREATMENT

Causes, Types, Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

SOURCES:

National Institutes of Health.

Glaucoma Research Foundation: “Other Types of Glaucoma,” “Questions & Answers: Normal-Tension Glaucoma,” “Symptoms of Angle-Closure Glaucoma,” “Medication Guide,” “What Can I Do To Prevent Glaucoma?” “What You Can Do to Manage Your Glaucoma, “Dry Eyes and Glaucoma: Double Trouble,” “Summertime Tips,”  “Learn About Glaucoma,” “How Often Should I Have My Eyes Tested?” “Five Common Glaucoma Tests,” “Glaucoma Medications and Their Side Effects,” “Should You Be Smoking Marijuana to Treat Your Glaucoma?”

American Academy of Ophthalmology: “What Are the Symptoms of Glaucoma?” “Who Is at Risk for Glaucoma?” “What Is Ocular Hypertension?” “Glaucoma Treatment,” “Does Marijuana Help Treat Glaucoma?” “Early Detection Key to Slowing Progression of Glaucoma.”

Mayo Clinic: “Glaucoma.”

CDC: “Don’t Let Glaucoma Steal Your Sight!”

American Glaucoma Society.

Weinreb, R. Lancet, 2004.

Curcio, C. Journal of Comparative Neurology, Oct. 1, 1990.

American Academy of Ophthalmology.

U.S. Preventive Services Task force: “Screening for

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TREATMENT

Symptoms, Causes, Diagnosis, and Treatment

What Is Angina?

Angina is chest pain that happens because there isn’t enough blood going to part of your heart. It can feel like a heart attack, with pressure or squeezing in your chest. It’s sometimes called angina pectoris or ischemic chest pain.

It’s a symptom of heart disease, and it happens when something blocks your arteries or there’s not enough blood flow in the arteries that bring oxygen-rich blood to your heart.

Angina usually goes away quickly. Still, it can be a sign of a life-threatening heart problem. It’s important to find out what’s going on and what you can do to avoid a heart attack.

Usually, medicine and lifestyle changes can control angina. If it’s more severe, you may need surgery, too. Or you may need what’s called a stent, a tiny tube that props open arteries.

There are different types of angina:

Stable angina. This is the

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THERAPY

Epley, Semont, Foster, and Brandt-Daroff

The spinning sensation and dizziness you get from vertigo can limit your activities and make you feel sick. Depending on the cause, though, some simple maneuvers you can do at home might bring relief.

The most common type of this condition is BPPV (benign paroxysmal positional vertigo). It happens when small crystals of calcium get loose in your inner ear. You may feel it when you’re getting in or out of bed, or tilting your head up. People over age 60 are more likely to get BPPV. It’s also the easiest type of vertigo to treat.

Before you try to treat it yourself, see your doctor. If you have vertigo, you’ll need to know what type it is and which ear has the problem. To determine affected side:

  • Sit on bed so that if you lie down, your head hangs slightly over the end of the bed.
  • turn head to
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TREATMENT

Erection Problems, Treatment, Surgery, and Complications

If you think you have ED, a good first step is to talk with your doctor. The treatment you need will depend on what’s causing it.

You may find that simple lifestyle changes will help, like losing weight, drinking less alcohol, or quitting smoking.

If a medication is causing your ED, your doctor may lower your dose or try a different drug altogether.

There are also other treatments. They include:

Counseling

If anxiety or stress is causing your ED, it may help to talk to a professional therapist.

Life-changing problems or even everyday stress can trigger erectile dysfunction. Talking about these things with a licensed therapist can ease sexual anxiety and help you feel more confident in your relationship.

Usually you’ll only need a handful of sessions. You may want to include your partner, as well.

Medications

ED medicines can be pills, drugs inserted into the tip of the penis,

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TREATMENT

Vertigo: Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment

Vertigo is a sensation of feeling off balance. If you have these dizzy spells, you might feel like you are spinning or that the world around you is spinning.

Causes of Vertigo

Vertigo is often caused by an inner ear problem. Some of the most common causes include:

BPPV. These initials stand for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. BPPV occurs when tiny calcium particles (canaliths) are dislodged from their normal location and collect in the inner ear. The inner ear sends signals to the brain about head and body movements relative to gravity. It helps you keep your balance.

BPPV can occur for no known reason and may be associated with age.

Meniere’s disease. This is an inner ear disorder thought to be caused by a buildup of fluid and changing pressure in the ear. It can cause episodes of vertigo along with ringing in the ears (tinnitus) and hearing loss.

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SUPPLEMENT

New York State Supplement Program

OTDA Home Programs & Services New York State Supplement Program (SSP)

Overview

SSP provides state-funded financial assistance to aged, blind and disabled individuals and is part of the monthly benefit paid to most Supplemental Security Income (SSI) recipients.


Applying for SSP

You must submit an application for federal SSI benefits to the Social Security Administration (SSA). This serves as your application for SSP benefits. SSA shares this information with New York State, who will determine your eligibility for SSP benefits.


There is no online SSI Application. Please schedule an appointment with a local Social Security office to file an application.

For more information on how to apply for SSI benefits, visit www.ssa.gov.


Eligibility

You are eligible for SSP benefits if you:

  • Are an adult who is age 65 or older; or are blind or disabled; or are a child under the
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